Oy Bay!

"My heart is in the east, and I in the uttermost west." — Yehudah Ha-Levi

Local College Jewess featured on Jewish Student Weekly

Posted by Oyster on February 17, 2007

Sari Bourne Stanford Jewish Student Weekly

JEWISH STUDENT WEEKLY
week of 2 Adar, 5767 and February 19, 2007

We started publishing 18 weeks ago. Sorry if that was tmi. Anyone who’s helped deserves a major…

Already bored with Barack? Hung up on Hillary? We inaugurate the future president series highlighting some of the most promising and proactive members of our generation. Not that we haven’t done that already.

We recently interviewed Stanford senior Sari Bourne, a truly inspiring force both on and off Stanford University’s campus. Without further ado…
\n
\njsw: what experience\ngrowing up led you to become active in the Jewish community?
\nsari: My Jewish identity boils down to one memory- one moment in my\nlife where I felt something larger than life. I was four, in\npre-school, sitting on a floor in a large room with fifty other\npreschool children. We were singing "bashana haba'ah," holding hands. I\nlooked up to the center of the circle to see a woman with a large afro,\nplaying guitar, singing her heart out to the song: "otireh otireh…" I\nlook to my left and my right to see my other Jewish friends singing\nhappily, and that was the moment that I knew I loved being Jewish. I\nloved knowing that there were thousands of other Jewish children in the\nworld singing the same song. I loved knowing I had friends, I was\nJewish, and that we were a community.
\n
\njsw: what has been\nyour most rewarding experience in the jewish community?
\nsari: I just came back from Israel last month. As the Western\ncoordinator for the American Union of Jewish Students, I attended the\nWorld Union of Jewish Students (WUJS) Congress in Israel. WUJS is a\nstudent-run organization, functioning similar to Hillel, but for every\nother country but the US. I had the chance to petition to allow the\nUnited States to be admitted to the Congress, so that the United States\nmay have a voice in the International Jewish Student community. It was\nonly at this point that I was able to meet the other Jewish students I\nhad envisioned as my community when I was four. I met Indian Jews,\nArgentinian Jews, Australian Jews, Macedonian Jews, South African Jews.\nThe best feeling of Congress, for me personally, was knowing the\nstrength of the International Jewish community-I had way too much fun\nwith them.
\n
\njsw: anything you're\nparticularly excited about after graduation?
\nsari: I'm really excited to support Israel off campus. For the past\nfour years, I've been really active in Stanford's pro-Israel community,\nbut I want to expand both who I impact and from whom I learn.”,1] ); //–>

jsw: what experience growing up led you to become active in the Jewish community?
sari: My Jewish identity boils down to one memory- one moment in my life where I felt something larger than life. I was four, in pre-school, sitting on a floor in a large room with fifty other preschool children. We were singing “bashana haba’ah,” holding hands. I looked up to the center of the circle to see a woman with a large afro, playing guitar, singing her heart out to the song: “otireh otireh…” I look to my left and my right to see my other Jewish friends singing happily, and that was the moment that I knew I loved being Jewish. I loved knowing that there were thousands of other Jewish children in the world singing the same song. I loved knowing I had friends, I was Jewish, and that we were a community.

jsw: what has been your most rewarding experience in the jewish community?
sari: I just came back from Israel last month. As the Western coordinator for the American Union of Jewish Students, I attended the World Union of Jewish Students (WUJS) Congress in Israel. WUJS is a student-run organization, functioning similar to Hillel, but for every other country but the US. I had the chance to petition to allow the United States to be admitted to the Congress, so that the United States may have a voice in the International Jewish Student community. It was only at this point that I was able to meet the other Jewish students I had envisioned as my community when I was four. I met Indian Jews, Argentinian Jews, Australian Jews, Macedonian Jews, South African Jews. The best feeling of Congress, for me personally, was knowing the strength of the International Jewish community-I had way too much fun with them.

jsw: anything you’re particularly excited about after graduation?
sari: I’m really excited to support Israel off campus. For the past four years, I’ve been really active in Stanford’s pro-Israel community, but I want to expand both who I impact and from whom I learn.jsw: anything you're\nparticularly nervous about after graduation?
\nsari: I'm really, REALLY nervous about cooking. I just don't cook. I\neat at friends' houses, and make killer turkey sandwiches. But really,\nI have a feeling I'll be spending a lot of time attempting to learn to\nmake a chicken, failing, and going down the street to pick up take-out.
\n
\njsw: would you like to\nrun for public office someday?
\nsari: My high school friends always talked about me running for\nPresident. I just sort of veered away from politics early in my college\ncareer. Now I just can't get my head out of Washington D.C. I don't\nthink I'll run for anything in the near future, but maybe later on down\nthe line.
\n
\njsw: what issues are\nyou particularly passionate about?
\nsari: I'm very passionate about Israel advocacy issues and combating\nthe recent rise of anti-Semitism (surprise, surprise). However, I am\nalso interested in non-Jewish issues as well: My father is a physician\nand has ingrained in me the need for universal health care in our\nsociety. Moreover, having grown up in California, I realize the\nimportance of the environment and the serious threat of global-warming.
\n
\njsw: what do you\nenvision yourself doing in ten years?
\nsari: After having taken a few law classes, researching in the Stanford\nLaw School, and loving every second of it, I have become very excited\nabout attending law school in the near future. Law school will provide\nme with a very important skill set and with the background necessary to\nfight for civil rights in public interest law. Moreover, I hope to have\nrepresented the Jewish community in some sort of capacity- whether as a\nspokesperson for a Jewish federation or organization, or as the Jewish\nliaison to a party or government department.
\n
\n“,1] ); //–>

jsw: anything you’re particularly nervous about after graduation?
sari: I’m really, REALLY nervous about cooking. I just don’t cook. I eat at friends’ houses, and make killer turkey sandwiches. But really, I have a feeling I’ll be spending a lot of time attempting to learn to make a chicken, failing, and going down the street to pick up take-out.

jsw: would you like to run for public office someday?
sari: My high school friends always talked about me running for President. I just sort of veered away from politics early in my college career. Now I just can’t get my head out of Washington D.C. I don’t think I’ll run for anything in the near future, but maybe later on down the line.

jsw: what issues are you particularly passionate about?
sari: I’m very passionate about Israel advocacy issues and combating the recent rise of anti-Semitism (surprise, surprise). However, I am also interested in non-Jewish issues as well: My father is a physician and has ingrained in me the need for universal health care in our society. Moreover, having grown up in California, I realize the importance of the environment and the serious threat of global-warming.

jsw: what do you envision yourself doing in ten years?
sari: After having taken a few law classes, researching in the Stanford Law School, and loving every second of it, I have become very excited about attending law school in the near future. Law school will provide me with a very important skill set and with the background necessary to fight for civil rights in public interest law. Moreover, I hope to have represented the Jewish community in some sort of capacity- whether as a spokesperson for a Jewish federation or organization, or as the Jewish liaison to a party or government department.


\nsari: I've loved Stanford with all my heart. This place has provided me\nwith an invaluable education-through professors, classes, friends, and\nsimply the late night conversations about affirmative action and\nexistentialism. Looking back on the last four years, I have grown so\nmuch as an individual. I thank every faculty member, staff member, and\nfriend for making my Stanford experience the best years of my life so\nfar.
\n
\njsw: what motivates\nyou as a leader?
\nsari: I don't ever look horizontally, at my peers and the alternative\npaths they have chosen. I don't ever think about what I "should do" or\nthink about the position in which I would have been if I had continued\ndown another certain path. Instead, my vertical visions inspire and\nencourage me to bloom into what I WANT to become- how I want to CHANGE\nthe world. I'm often labeled a "free-spirit," "over-passionate," and\ncompletely "optimistic." I'm proud, and I'm not budging. I love having\nvery high hopes for the future- knowing that it is individuals who find\nalternative sources of energy, found the facebook, and campaign to end\nthe genocides in Darfur. I'm confident in our society's ability to\nprogress, and I will only look to the pat to our amazing human rights\nconflicts and advancements as well as our technological advancements\nand hurdles of the 20th century to envision a bright future.
\n
\nKnow an amazing young\nJewish adult you think we should menschen?
\nlet us know at\njewishstudentweekly@gmail.com
\n
\n
\n
\nFROM INDIA WITH LOVE”,1] ); //–>jsw: how would you rate your time at stanford?
sari: I’ve loved Stanford with all my heart. This place has provided me with an invaluable education-through professors, classes, friends, and simply the late night conversations about affirmative action and existentialism. Looking back on the last four years, I have grown so much as an individual. I thank every faculty member, staff member, and friend for making my Stanford experience the best years of my life so far.

jsw: what motivates you as a leader?
sari: I don’t ever look horizontally, at my peers and the alternative paths they have chosen. I don’t ever think about what I “should do” or think about the position in which I would have been if I had continued down another certain path. Instead, my vertical visions inspire and encourage me to bloom into what I WANT to become- how I want to CHANGE the world. I’m often labeled a “free-spirit,” “over-passionate,” and completely “optimistic.” I’m proud, and I’m not budging. I love having very high hopes for the future- knowing that it is individuals who find alternative sources of energy, found the facebook, and campaign to end the genocides in Darfur. I’m confident in our society’s ability to progress, and I will only look to the pat to our amazing human rights conflicts and advancements as well as our technological advancements and hurdles of the 20th century to envision a bright future.

Know an amazing young Jewish adult you think we should menschen?
let us know at jewishstudentweekly@gmail.com

Want to get straight to the source? Sign up for the JSW’s email list ( they refuse to get bloggy for some inexplicable reason, despite my most heartfelt protestations…).

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Local College Jewess featured on Jewish Student Weekly”

  1. TM said

    I hate the word “Jewess.”

  2. Oyster said

    Hmmm… I kinda like the word. Because I really like female Jews. They’re awesome. And since English, unlike Russian, Spanish or Yiddish, is lacking in feminine diminutives which are so expressive, I latch on to the few that we have.

    Some argue that having a male and female name for Jews is akin to how many animals in English are given a distinct name for the male and female sexes. In that way, it is actually offensive. A linguistic anachronism from a more Antisemitic culture, that persists as a relic in our modern vernacular.

    So ™, what’s your beef with ‘Jewess’?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: